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that mr. mandela brought about in south africa. my visit with him in '96, i had the privilege of spending nearly an hour with him in his office in south africa. the thing that struck me the most about mr. mandela, when you are in the presence of someone viewed by his countrymen as george washington, abraham lincoln and martin luther king it's intimidating. the thing that struck me is how open and engaging and humorous he was. we had a great time talking and laughing. i said to myself, an icon should not be this happy and laughing. you know, i expected a stone figure and i found a very -- >> doctor, can you reflect on how nelson mandela impacted those that you managed during your tenure at universities like howard? >> caller: sure. i was president of howard for 13 years. during that time, prior to my becoming president, mr. mandela received an honorary degree from howard. it was the first honorary degree he received from an american university. we are proud of that. mr. mandela, when i visited with him reminded me of his visit to washington and howard. he asked a question whether or not th
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
. mandela and mrs. mandela in the flat in london. it was a small apartment. we met and it was extraordinary. i was in the room with living history. i was in the presence of greatness. this man's humility about the combination, there is no question that nelson mandela was a man who embodied what martin luther king jr. talked about in referring to the spirit of the times. here was a man who was out of a sense of directioning history and those around him. a man who didn't presume to be the mouth piece for god. nevertheless spoke for millions of people not only in south africa, but around the world. the courage it took to for give south africa into its future. his love ethic that they spoke about was the predicate for the expansion of opportunity for africans who were black to join with africans who were white and others to forge the future of that nation. what's interesting as many criticize mr. obama here, president obama who was encouraged by him. i was at the white house when the film was screened. i had the opportunity to see barack obama introduce a film about nelson mandela was a bit of
. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of peace. of forgiveness -- a man forgiveness. a man of inspiration to millions of people around the world. that the truly sad same cannot be said about the man who spoke about earlier today from the white house. noson mandela had divisiveness. he had no enemies. he had -- he did not desire to cause division. barack obama is low. nelson mandela -- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and m
woman, very dignified woman, you know, mrs. mandela, win any mandela the girls, nani, zuni they have been beautiful through this whole process. i think there is a profound sense of sadness, because when you finally get the word that, you know, the chief is gone, you know, it is overwhelming but i think there is an equal amount of joy and festivity and people celebrating, okay, now this major event has happened, but i think the family is actually very dignified and holding up very well. >> rose: what do we know what is going to happen between now and the actual funeral day? >> yes, there is, you know, there is a number, a series of protocols that have been put in place by the south african government are executing, obviously on the tenth there will be a huge rally in soweto, you know, archbishop tutu will preside over the funeral, the funeral is on the 15th and i would anticipate it would be one of the largest gatherings of heads of state in, you know, in modern history. you may see more heads of state attend mandela's funeral that john f. kennedy's funeral so it is going to be very e
the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld. each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renew
. he reminded me of my grandfather. had uncanny resemblance. i told him that. i said, mr. mandela, i showed him a picture of my grandfather, he said, we're all brothers. my grandfather had passed away by then. it was just his constant humility. and i think one of the things that i look at the nexus of the anc and naacp our struggle that was continuing in of -- going on in south africa there is a necks us that really made us as brothers and we had such an 'feign tee with him. affinity with him. he meant a lot to me. >> i think we would miss an opportunity if we treated everything that he accomplished, everything he was as something that we look back on. as the past. in fact he left homework for us to do. he left -- not only in south africa but also for us here. how do we relate. the things that we get upset about that we don't speak to people about. the fights we have, look what he forgave. look how he reconciled. the truth of the reconciliation in south africa still one of the most amazing things that's ever happened in the world. to face their accused and do something better. >> he
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
of the most humble people i've ever met. and mr. mandela arrived today, he said to the producer, said to him, what is the subject of today's show? [laughter] [applause] >> if anybody ever earned that our on oprah winfrey, it was nelson mandela. in closing this special report, bill, you worked so many years in the johannes berg -- in the johannesburg bureau. your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela? >> everybody acknowledges he is an icon and simple and all of that. i think what people tend to overlook and what in my mind made him exceptional among the thering figures of 21st century is he was such an astute politician. you look back over the whole trajectory of his life, he was at one time a lack nationalists, then a non-racialist, he opposed arm struggles, then took up arms struggles, then he dropped arm struggles. he was close partner of the ,outh african communist party and for a year or two was actually member of the communist party, yet as a president he was a close ally of south africa's capitalists. in other words, he was whatever served his purpose. he never lost sight of the b
into south africa, and we went in to have a conversation with mr. mandela. it was a true honor to watch both incredible minds exchanging and talking about both the past and the present. it was a very inspiring moment. you could see in that moment incredible wisdom and at the same time the incredible charm, his smile and laugh that inspired people around the world. >> ambassador gibbs, when you spent time as ambassador to south africa, can you describe how powerful nelson mandela's legend and legacy were were when it came to talking with members of the south african government? >> i think everyone in south africa, from those who knew him personally to those whose lives had been shaped by the legacy he left were so inspired by the example he set. it's a challenge for all of us, and i think the lesson i hope people will take away from his life is that we all can rise above our differences. i think south africa is still working to live up to the incredible example that he set. i think all of us around the world need to live up to that example in a time whether we are divided by political party,
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
. warmly welcomed at the white house. >> mr. mandela, a man who embodies the hopes of millions. >> reporter: it was bill clinton with whom he would develop the closest bond. mandela, now president of south africa, visited the white house during the darkest days of the clinton presidency. he gave his friend a boost. >> our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. >> reporter: this friendship clinton treasures to this day. >> we just hit it off. i just adored him. he was always, you know, he was a true friend. >> reporter: mandela, as an ex-president, met with george w. bush in 2005. but there was no love lost there. mandela was one of bush's harshest critics when it came to iraq. when we talked to bush about the ailing mandela earlier this year, there were no hard feelings. >> he promoted freedom. he was a really great leader. he was smart and capable. and made his mark. >> reporter: obama only met mandela once. ever so briefly as a junior senator. but his connection may be the most profound. it was mandela, he says, who awakened him to the wider world. inspiring him to political ac
of south africa said the mr. mandela's death is greatest sorrow. this is president speaking of mandela's family. so much our people would be free. very emotional words from the president of south africa. melissa: here is president obama. let's listen in. >> nelson mandela closed statement from the dock saying, i have fought against white domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. today he has gone home and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous an profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will, to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
admirerers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela -a pact was felt arou >>> your realtime captioner is mrs. linda m. macdonald. >>> world leaders and millions of admirers are mourning the passing of nelson mandela, a man whose impact was felt around the globe including right here in the bay area. good afternoon, i'm michelle griego. a day after the death of nelson mandela, much of the world has paused to reflect on his legacy and also his accomplishments. cbs reporter tara mergener is live in washington with more. >> reporter: mandela was an international icon. today millions are mourning his passing and celebrating his remarkable life. the flag is after half-staff at the south african embassy in washington. outside his home in johannesburg, mourners are gathering to remember the man they called madiba. a memorial service will be held tuesday and the outpouring of love says something with the caliber of the man who led the country out of apartheid. >> we'll always love madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger to build a new nation. >> reporte
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)